books

Book Mail: April 2019

Hey guys!

Been a while, I know…

I thought I’d share bookmail on the blog as well.

If you’ve come here from Instagram, HIGH FIVE!! Please don’t forget to subscribe! PLEASE **inserting super duper crying emoji**

Here are 5 books I received recently:

1- After the end by Clare Mackintosh from Little Brown.

From New York Times bestselling author Clare Mackintosh, a deeply moving and page-turning novel about an impossible choice—and the two paths fate could take.

Max and Pip are the strongest couple you know. They’re best friends, lovers, unshakable. But then their son gets sick and the doctors put the question of his survival into their hands. For the first time, Max and Pip can’t agree. They each want a different future for their son.

What if they could have both?

A gripping and propulsive exploration of love, marriage, parenthood, and the road not taken, After the End brings one unforgettable family from unimaginable loss to a surprising, satisfying, and redemptive ending and the life they are fated to find. With the emotional power of Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper, Mackintosh helps us to see that sometimes the end is just another beginning.

Click HERE to buy!

2- Call Me Evie by JP Pomare from Little Brown.

In this propulsive, twist-filled, and haunting psychological suspense debut perfect for fans of Sharp Objects and Room, a seventeen-year-old girl struggles to remember the role she played on the night her life changed forever.

For the past two weeks, seventeen-year-old Kate Bennet has lived against her will in an isolated cabin in a remote beach town–brought there by a mysterious man named Bill. Part captor, part benefactor, Bill calls her Evie and tells her he’s hiding her to protect her. That she did something terrible one night back home in Melbourne–something so unspeakable that he had no choice but to take her away. The trouble is, Kate can’t remember the night in question. 

The fragments of Kate’s shattered memories of her old life seem happy: good friends, a big house in the suburbs, a devoted boyfriend. Bill says he’ll help her fill in the blanks–but his story isn’t adding up. And as she tries to reconcile the girl she thought she’d been with the devastating consequences Bill claims she’s responsible for, Kate will unearth secrets about herself and those closest to her that could change everything. 

A riveting debut novel that fearlessly plumbs the darkest recesses of the mind, Call Me Evie explores the fragility of memory and the potential in all of us to hide the truth, even from ourselves.

Click HERE to buy!

3- The Watermelon Boys by Ruqaya Izzidien sent to me by the Author.

It is the winter of 1915 and Iraq has been engulfed by the First World War. Hungry for independence from Ottoman rule, Ahmad leaves his peaceful family life on the banks of the Tigris to join the British-led revolt. Thousands of miles away, Welsh teenager Carwyn reluctantly enlists and is sent, via Gallipoli and Egypt, to the Mesopotamia campaign.

Carwyn’s and Ahmad’s paths cross, and their fates are bound together. Both are forever changed, not only by their experience of war, but also by the parallel discrimination and betrayal they face.

Ruqaya Izzidien’s evocative debut novel is rich with the heartbreak and passion that arise when personal loss and political zeal collide, and offers a powerful retelling of the history of British intervention in Iraq.

Click HERE to buy.

4- Heartstream by Tom Pollock sent to me by Walker Books.

I just wanted to see you. Before the end. A taut psychological thriller about obsession, fame and betrayal, for fans of Black Mirror.

Cat is in love. Always the sensible one, she can’t believe that she’s actually dating, not to mention dating a star. But the fandom can’t know. They would eat her alive. And first at the buffet would definitely be her best friend, Evie.

Amy uses Heartstream, a social media app that allows others to feel your emotions. She broadcasted every moment of her mother’s degenerative illness, and her grief following her death. It’s the realest, rawest reality TV imaginable.

But on the day of Amy’s mother’s funeral, Amy finds a strange woman in her kitchen. She’s rigged herself and the house with explosives – and she’s been waiting to talk to Amy for a long time. Who is she? A crazed fan? What does she want?

Amy and Cat are about to discover how far true obsession can go.

Click HERE to buy!

5- Malamander by Thomas Taylor sent to me by Walker Books.

Nobody visits Eerie-on-Sea in the winter. Especially not when darkness falls and the wind howls around Maw Rocks and the wreck of the battleship Leviathan, where even now some swear they have seen the unctuous Malamander creep…

Herbert Lemon, Lost-and-Founder at the Grand Nautilus Hotel, knows that returning lost things to their rightful owners is not easy – especially when the lost thing is not a thing at all, but a girl. No one knows what happened to Violet Parma’s parents twelve years ago, and when she engages Herbie to help her find them, the pair discover that their disappearance might have something to do with the legendary sea-monster, the Malamander. Eerie-on-Sea has always been a mysteriously chilling place, where strange stories seem to wash up. And it just got stranger…

Click HERE to buy!

books, REVIEWS

The Elephant Vanishes by Haruki Murakami

A short story collection in which Murakami explores the mundane and treads the thin line between magic and reality (as usual!)

This was my second short story collection by Murakami, having read Men without women I had a general idea about his style when it comes to short stories.

I always have trouble reviewing short stories as it seems to become more about the author than about the plot or characters, there are simply too many.

Which gives me full rights to fangirl on this review!

What I like about Murakami is how he squeezes out interesting moments from daily life and how he can focus on one moment and make it feel like time is not a factor, like he’s taken us on a story telling limbo.

Another thing I’ve noticed is how almost all of his characters are regular people, no one too beautiful, no one too out of reach. The one thing he does seem to work on his characters is their absolute mediocrity. People with unfulfilling jobs, broken relationships and silly thoughts.

The highlight of this book was The Second Bakery Attack and The Elephant Vanishes.

The first is a weirdly eventful night between a newly married couple who end up roaming around town looking to steal bread from a bakery.

The Elephant Vanishes is one of those of Murakami’s where he leaves things unanswered and flirts with the idea of endless possibilities. You can buy the book here

If you are new to Murakami, I’d suggest reading my blog post ‘Why I no longer recommend Murakami to readers’

Another Murakami I have reviewed is his latest Killing Commendatore

books, REVIEWS

A place for us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

I have always been secretly proud of my ability to express my thoughts on books in concentrated ways enabling readers of my reviews to decide for themselves if they would like to read them or not. Unfortunately, I don’t think I can or want to do that with this one, you HAVE to read it.

I’m going to stick to three main points of the book:

▪️The Storytelling

▫️The Characters

▪️The Relatability

▪️What struck me most within the first 50 pages of the book was how expertly the plot is handled and weaves around the characters. The narrative jumps ahead and around multiple times and it doesn’t take much effort to know when it’s taking place. I noticed subtle hints are included within the first few paragraphs of each new timeline and I’d automatically readjust the ages of each character to fit the narrative.

▫️At our core, we are all flawed and most of us try our best to do what we can to improve ourselves and adjust to our surroundings; to embrace our traditions and yet accept new ones. Writing such characters never seems like an easy task, but to write such characters and join their lives together in a way that compliments and completes them is exactly what Fatima has accomplished. There isn’t one character I could clearly point out and say was right or wrong. They all had their reasons behind their words and actions.

▪️Having been born in a foreign country and then lived almost all of my life outside of my own, there are things that I know and understand and experience regularly but have unfortunately never had the privilege to hear out loud. A Place for Us became my little place where I found solace in the five days I took to read it. It’s going to remain with me for a very long time and perhaps finally become the first book I might revisit year in and year out.

I had the privilege to talk to Fatima right after I read the book, it reminded me of what JD Salinger wrote in the incomparable voice of Holden: “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.” Well, it happened! Thank you Fatima!

You can buy the book here

books, REVIEWS

Anne Frank’s Diary (the graphic novel) adapted by Ari Folman, illustrated by David Polonsky

“How wonderful is it that nobody needs to wait a single moment before starting to improve the world”

Thank you @aaKnopf for sending the book!

#theguywiththebookreview presents Anne Franks Diary : Graphic Adaptation.

The biggest tragedy with reviewing this book is I don’t remember if I’ve actually read the original version as a kid or not. I think I have, but my memory fails me once again.

Nevertheless, I picked it up and a couple of days later I realized that it has been one of my most surreal experiences with a book.

As with all graphic novels, the focus is on the illustrations but I was happy to see that several pages worth of original texts were copied to it as well.

If you didn’t know Anne and her family with a few other people were hiding from the Nazis in an Attic in Amsterdam. They hid for 2 years.

Anne starts writing in her Diary (she names it Kitty) The book is full of her diary entries or ‘conversations’ with Kitty.

She is brutally honest and questions whatever she can. She is rebellious as well as thoughtful. It’s a book which shows how the human spirit can break and did break during under the Nazi regime.

What I didn’t remember was how the book ended, and ended it did with a lot of emotion. I had almost forgotten that this book is not fiction and was written not by an adult but a teenage girl coming to terms with life and how hers isn’t normal.

I’m pretty sure there is not much I can add without repeating other readers, I don’t think I need to review characters or pace either. This books isn’t about them, but it still somehow excels in them! The hardships of having to live in hiding isn’t just the claustrophobia but also the several impossibilities to life which includes getting enough food to eat, medical attention and simply fresh air.

I think this graphic version might make it a perfect stepping stone to reading the full version.l, especially for teenagers.

You can buy the book here

books, REVIEWS

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

The Silent Patient is the type of book I wouldn’t shy away from calling the new representative of a whole genre, The Psychological Thriller!

#theguywiththebookreview presents The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

We have a loving wife who seemingly randomly shoots her husband 5 times on his face and kills him. The interesting part is that she stops saying or reacting to anything or anyone. She’s deemed unfit and sent to a psychiatric clinic where our protagonist shows up, Theo.

He is obsessed with Alicia’s high profile murder case and as a psychiatrist he wants to finally be the one who makes her talk and gets to the bottom of what happened that fateful night.

I enjoyed the ‘back and forth’ between Theo and the silent Alicia. There was a frustrating feeling with how Alicia kept quiet which builds up a lot of anticipation for the final third and the expected revelation of the book!

There were many theories that I had by midway but then I just gave up as none of them made sense even to me and I couldn’t be bothered making an effort which I knew would eventually feel foolish and stupid. I felt stupid any way!

Absolutely brilliant and a must read for anyone who likes a good twist!

You can buy the book here

books, REVIEWS

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

There is a certain charm to a book when one of the characters isn’t what normally defines a character. The Australian Outback was just the type of ‘character’ I love in a book!

#theguywiththebookreview presents The Lost Man by @janeharperauthor

There were three things which took center stage for me:

▪️The atmospheric feel of the Outback

▪️The protagonist Nathan’s claustrophobia

▪️The timing of the Big Reveal

Forming an image of the Australian Outback is kind of easy, just think about barren land all around you. But giving it character and defining the undefinable is what set the mood and the plot. The tree and grave, although tiny details, amazingly catapult us into the intricate rabbit hole that Harper creates!

I loved how even though the book is set in the vast expanse of the Outback, the protagonist always seemed to be struggling within himself and feeling bound from all sides, helpless. The claustrophobic feeling around his character made me want him to be free. I haven’t felt like that for many characters in recent times.

With most whodunnits my biggest issue is always the timing of the ‘Big Reveal’. I want it to be right at the end, preferably the last few pages. A feeling that leaves me jaw dropped and wowed! The timing in The Lost Man was exactly that, very well wrapped up right at the end!

You can buy the book here

REVIEWS

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

I don’t know how to start talking about a book which I went through faster than a cup of coffee. This is the type of literature which has the power to redifine humanity and remould the world.
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#theguywiththebookreview presents Sea Prayer by @khosseini

I was deeply moved by The Kite Runner and later absolutely shattered by A thousand Splendid Suns. When I heard about this book I thought the primary goal of it was to tell the story of Alan Kurdi, the little Syrian child whose body was washed ashore while he and his family were trying to seek refuge in Europe. Their boat had capsized and Alan along with his dear mother and brother lost their lives. The only one who survived was Alan’s father. But I was wrong, it’s not only about Alan.

Beautifully wed with enchanting illustrations, this fictional take on Alan is heartwrenching and its effects linger for days. I wasn’t able to sleep properly the night I read it and I still get upset when I think about it. I’m writing this review after atleast a month since I failed to write it the last 2 times I tried.

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This book is linked to UNHCR @refugees and all proceeds from it go towards it and The Khaled Hosseini Foundation.
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I doubt that @khosseini will read this review, but if you do, Sir, I salute you for what you have done to highlight once again poor Alan’s fate and many other kids and families who risk their lives just to be able to breath, eat and sleep.
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You can buy this book from my affiliate link here