books

Episode 06 – Magar Feminism Hai Kya?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-9pju5-e3ac72

Neha Vyas of Anat Speaks joins Gibraan and Faroukh on Kal Ki Taaza Khabar to discuss Feminism, Womens Rights and Ekta Kapoor (Dhadang Dhadang Dhadang!!!)

You can click and find Neha on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube.

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You can also find us on Instagram, on Twitter or can email us at kalkitaazakhabar@gmail.com

Gibraan is here on Twitter and Instagram

Faroukh is here on Twitter and Instagram

books

Minisode 00 – Aik Kuttay Ki Kahani

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-86bx6-e35b00

Gibraan and Faroukh do their first Minisode and talk about AWCS who rescued a dog stuck in a borewell in Warangal – 150 Kms away from Hyderabad.

AWCS are known for carrying out some of the most technically challenging rescues, AWCS is a 14-year-old organisation working for animal welfare.

Animal Warriors Conservation Society – Instagram and Twitter

The Times Of India Instagram Post – HERE

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You can also find us on Instagram, on Twitter or can email us at kalkitaazakhabar@gmail.com

Gibraan is here on Twitter and Instagram

Faroukh is here on Twitter and Instagram

 
books

Epidsode 05 – Magar Placement Hogi Ke Nahi?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-ard3h-e335c1

Gibraan and Faroukh are joined by Saad who is the Regional Representative of South Asia and Middle East for Asia Pacific University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

You can reach Saad on Instagram or on his email at saad@apu.edu.my

Get 2 months of free premium skillshare: FREE SKILLSHARE LINK

You can also find us on Instagram, on Twitter or can email us at kalkitaazakhabar@gmail.com

Gibraan is here on Twitter and Instagram

Faroukh is here on Twitter and Instagram

books

Episode 03 – Hyderabadi Yaadein Aur 90s ki Baatein

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-x9te4-e2ac54

Gibraan and Faroukh talk with their first guest, Vivek Tejuja, Author of a Memoir: “So Now You Know” but he’s got more to talk about than just books! We talk about intellectual farts and life in Hyderabad!

Here’s the SkillShare link for two free months, please use this to support us, we really need those Mics! : FREE TWO MONTHS OF SKILLSHARE LINK

You can find Vivek on Twitter and Instagram

Gibraan on Twitter and Instagram

Faroukh on Twitter and Instagram

Kal Ki Taaza Khabar on Twitter and Instagram

 

books, REVIEWS

The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

I’ve had Colson’s Underground Railroad on my tbr for more than two years so when I found this book in my mail box, I started it immediately but had I known how much it would tire me, I would’ve waited a few days at-least. (Not that that would change the experience)

#theguywiththebookreview presents The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead sent to me by Little Brown (Thank you!)

Based and inspired by the history of Arthur G. Dozier School for reform of Boys (I recommend you read about it if you don’t know it’s history) The Nickel Boys was one of the best starts of any book I’ve read in recent times. Intrigued and almost invested in the story of Elwood Curtis, a black kid who dreamed of college education and a better future in a time when America was as divided as it has ever been, I had to stop and reflect at the injustice faced by so many in America’s history.

How a kid with so much promise ends up in a correctional facility which is infamous for abuse and violence against the kids, for no fault of his own, is worth more than what The Nickel Boys gave.

Filled with characters that have nothing to do with the plot and in no way move the book forward, it felt like Colson had included a plethora of them to make the books impact stronger, by giving names and introductions. Sadly it didn’t work for me, it just created more branches that were not needed. Character development was not something expected from any of these almost random characters but I felt that Elwood’s character should have been given more focus.

Somewhere I feel an all knowing narrative would’ve worked better, and by part two of the book it was slowly becoming a extremely tiresome to read.

Two instances of the book will catch your attention, the Encyclopedia in part one and the Lashes in part two. Both should have had a bigger emotional impact but somehow felt like they were trying too hard.

By the end of part three where the book takes a really big turn and jumps way ahead, we learn about the effects the school has had on the boys. This would’ve been my favorite part but it seemed like there was forced purpose behind the ending. Colson wanted to end the book a certain way and he wrote FOR the book and not the story.

There is a unexpected twist at the end which does change a lot of the experience but by then it was too late for me to like it.

An interesting book, a great conversation generator as well. I guess when we think about books with racism at its core, we expect to be moved a bit more, maybe that’s our fault as readers, maybe that’s just reality.

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If you’re interested in buying the book, click here for my affiliate link

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And if you are looking for more book reviews, please find the links here:

It’s Not About The Burqa by Mariah Khan

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

If Cats Disappeared From The World by Genki Kawamura

The Man-Eater Of Malgudi by R.K.Narayan

The Elephant Vanishes by Haruki Murakami

Anne Frank’s Diary (Graphic Adaptation)

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

A Long Wall To Water by Linda Sue Park

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

So Lucky by Nicola Griffith

Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

Eve of Man by Giovanna and Tom Fletcher

Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence

books, REVIEWS

Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence

“For Connie had adopted the standard of the young: what there was in the moment was everything. And moments followed one another without necessarily belonging to one another.”

#theguywiththebookreview presents Lady Chatterley’s Lover by DH Lawrence

Let’s first address the elephant in the room, what is Faroukh doing reading Lady Chatterly’s Lover. Well. It was for free and I got curious.

Well, curiosity killed the elephant and he’s no more.

Based on the quote you’d think you’ll get a very deep book, it’s not.

DH Lawrence gives us some absolutely brilliant streams of consciousness throughout the book but it’s laden with what some would call guilty pleasures but to me they were just annoying.

This is the kind of book you would want someone to read if you wanted them to feel annoyed. There are several rants and a lot of the book is just plain boring.

As expected it’s dramatic and the character’s behaviors are just something you don’t get.

I would recommend this to all of my enemies, suffer, as I have. Click HERE to buy the book via my affiliate link.

Please consider subscribing to my blog HERE.

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If you are looking for more book reviews, please find the links here:

It’s Not About The Burqa by Mariah Khan

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

If Cats Disappeared From The World by Genki Kawamura

The Man-Eater Of Malgudi by R.K.Narayan

The Elephant Vanishes by Haruki Murakami

Anne Frank’s Diary (Graphic Adaptation)

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

A Long Wall To Water by Linda Sue Park

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

So Lucky by Nicola Griffith

Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

Eve of Man by Giovanna and Tom Fletcher

books

Chapter 9: Luxembourg. The Traveling Biblio Chronicles.

Hey guys! We’re back with another chapter which I’m really excited about! I’ve had chats randomly with Sophia (You might know her as TeaCupBookWorld on Instagram) over the last few months and recently she was kind enough to give us some of her time and write up a recommendation for Luxembourg. I honestly had no idea about the place except the name (could hardly get the spelling right!) Sophia is a regular on Bookstagram where she is very active and does weekly readathons as well. I’ve recommended her account on bookstagram recently and am going to do that again. Click her name to reach her account: Sophia and let’s let Sophia take over this post!

At The Devil’s Banquets by Anise Koltz

It is only recently that I began to research local authors in Luxembourg, so for that reason my book recommendation today is a little different – this is a newly discovered author and book for me too.

I have lived in Luxembourg for just under two years and I am slowly learning about a unique culture which, before I relocated here, I barely knew existed. Luxembourg is a very small country bordering France, Germany and Belgium, so the most notable authors are usually of French or German origin.

The author I chose to discuss is Anise Koltz – she is the Vice President of the European Academy of Poetry, and the founder and director of the festival Les Journées de Mondorf. She was born in Luxembourg in 1928, but as Luxembourgish was not even a written language until about 30 years ago, the majority of her work is written in French and German (the two other local languages). Interestingly, she began by writing only in German, however, after the death of her husband – who was a victim of torture by the Nazi occupation  she could no longer bring herself to write in the German language. When she started writing again, the only language she would use, was French. 

Anise started her career by writing fairy stories in the 1950s, but later, she switched her focus to poetry. As a fellow poet myself, I was keen to explore her work and the words she wanted to share. The first book of her poetry that I encountered, is called ‘At the Devil’s Banquets’.

Her writing in this book fascinates me as it is so lyrical yet at the same time raw and painful. She makes bold statements questioning our world, and yet, her words are also metaphors and wild contemplations. There is a subtle anger in her style which really resonates with me:

‘Lost in space
eternity turns back
to the glacial era

Keeps watch over our petrified bodies
sites abandoned by time’

We encounter so much gentle and simple poetry in daily life (which definitely has its place) but we are not often faced with the truly hardhitting pieces. For me personally, I love to ponder a powerful stanza full of fearless observation.

Alongside this complex and dark narration, she also creates some intimate pieces about more runofthemill subjects such as the writing of poetry itself. I really enjoyed this piece called ‘The Poet’, below is a small extract:

‘He holds back the poem
the way you hold your breath

Until he learns to breathe 
against it

His wildcat’s
teeth grind

Every Poem
is a mark of his claws’

To read Anise’s work is to discover a wonderful correlation between her writing and Luxembourg itself – uncharted beauty where you are least expecting it.

This was Chapter 9 of the traveling biblio chornicles by Sophia. You can buy the book here from book depository
If you liked this post, please consider subscribing here
Do consider sharing this with your friends who might like to read more from our hopefully growing diverse list over the next weeks and months.

Our previous Chapters are as follows, have a look! 

Chapter 1: Australia here

Chapter 2: Afghanistan here

Chapter 3: Egypt here

Chapter 4: Palestine here

Chapter 5: Kenya here

Chapter 6: Pakistan here

Chapter 7: Argentina here

Chapter 8: Estonia here

books, REVIEWS

It’s Not About The Burqa edited by Mariam Khan

“No one woman can speak for all Muslim Women – for that rich and varied tapestry of experiences, practice, belief and ways of being” – Nadine Aisha Jassat

#theguywiththebookreview presents It’s Not About The Burqa

The quote above from Nadine came on the last page of the book and I think it reaffirms my original decision to not review this book the way I usually try to critically (although amateurly) look at the contents.

17 Muslim women from a wide range of backgrounds share their thoughts about what it is like to be a Muslim Woman, sometimes very visibly so (Hijabi Muslim Women) and sometimes not as visibly.

A few of the essays here were fascinating to me. Having lived most of my life where ‘normal’ to me is a lifestyle circled around Islam and practicing Muslims, the Muslim identity to has always been the default. Where segregation of sexes is the norm and where things go to a halt when it is prayer times (All shops close for 20-30 minutes during the 5 prayer times in Saudi Arabia)

There were essays which I absolutely disagreed with and then there were some that were almost enlightening. One in particular by Saima Mir definitely choked me up.

But without a doubt my absolutely favorite of all the essays came very early in the collection: On the Representation of Muslims *Terms and Conditions Apply by @nafisa_bakkar Her essay made a super lazy reader like me get up and grab my highlighter. I went crazy highlighting the stuff she’s written! Absolutely on point!

I would recommend this to readers across the board, Muslim or Non Muslim with a very small note that not everything in this book is about being a Muslim or Not being a Muslim. These are mostly experiences and aren’t to be taken word for word as a representation of or not of Islam.

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If you’re interested in buying the book, please click HERE for my Affiliate Link, Thank you!

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Please consider subscribing to my blog HERE.

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If you are looking for more book reviews, please find the links here:

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

If Cats Disappeared From The World by Genki Kawamura

The Man-Eater Of Malgudi by R.K.Narayan

The Elephant Vanishes by Haruki Murakami

Anne Frank’s Diary (Graphic Adaptation)

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

The Strange Case Of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

A Long Wall To Water by Linda Sue Park

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

So Lucky by Nicola Griffith

Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

Eve of Man by Giovanna and Tom Fletcher