books, REVIEWS

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

There is a certain charm to a book when one of the characters isn’t what normally defines a character. The Australian Outback was just the type of ‘character’ I love in a book!

#theguywiththebookreview presents The Lost Man by @janeharperauthor

There were three things which took center stage for me:

▪️The atmospheric feel of the Outback

▪️The protagonist Nathan’s claustrophobia

▪️The timing of the Big Reveal

Forming an image of the Australian Outback is kind of easy, just think about barren land all around you. But giving it character and defining the undefinable is what set the mood and the plot. The tree and grave, although tiny details, amazingly catapult us into the intricate rabbit hole that Harper creates!

I loved how even though the book is set in the vast expanse of the Outback, the protagonist always seemed to be struggling within himself and feeling bound from all sides, helpless. The claustrophobic feeling around his character made me want him to be free. I haven’t felt like that for many characters in recent times.

With most whodunnits my biggest issue is always the timing of the ‘Big Reveal’. I want it to be right at the end, preferably the last few pages. A feeling that leaves me jaw dropped and wowed! The timing in The Lost Man was exactly that, very well wrapped up right at the end!

You can buy the book here

books

Chapter 1: Australia. The Traveling Biblio Chronicles.

Lucy from The Literary Edit was crowned The best book blogger by The London Book Fair. In the few weeks since, we have had numerous discussions about blogging and books. She is one of the reasons I decided to start my own blog and explore this medium of social media as well.

Lucy is here today to kick off The Traveling Biblio Chronicles with a recommendation from Australia. She’s living there since a couple of years and her regular beach walk updates on Instagram are really refreshing and have such an Australian vibe to them!

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Her social media channels:

Book Blog – The Literary Edit

Twitter – @thelitedit

Bookstagram – @the_litedit

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Breath by Tim Winton

Given the fact that I’ve lived in Australia for over two and a half years now, albeit with a brief hiatus during which I lived in Bali, Los Angeles and London, I’ve read an embarrassingly small amount of Australian literature. I started off with fairly good intentions, reading Tracks and Picnic at Hanging Rock prior to my arrival in Sydney, followed by Peter Carey’s 30 Days in Sydney shortly after I landed. Yet in the many months that have since passed, the Australian writers I’ve read have been few and far between.

There are many, many things I love about Australia; its year round balmy weather, the endless stretches of sand, the coastal walks that are as stunning as they come. But the thing I love the most is the water, and the magic and healing power of the ocean.

And so when it comes to selecting a book to represent the country in which I live; the choice was an easy one: Breath by Tim Winton.

© Hannah Chanel

I bought the book long before I read it; and had a couple of other books by Tim Winton on my shelves, and yet it was only when the film adaptation was recently released that I finally got around to reading it. I live 100 meters from the water’s edge in Bondi, and get in it as often as I can, and Tim Winton’s much lauded novel is a love letter to the sun baked skin and salt washed hair so synonymous with life down under.

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© crazybooklady_

At its core, Breath is a story about two boys and their love of surfing, but above and beyond that it’s a story about the Australian waterways, in all their glorious and menacing forms. Until I read Breath I was yet to read anything that could come near to conveying my love for the land down under, but Tim Winton managed to articulate my love for this country, with poignancy and with power.

I don’t know how long I’ll be in Sydney; whether it’s my forever home or not, but while one day my memories of this country may fade, the feeling of the saltwater of the sea on my skin – much like my first reading of Breath – will remain ingrained on my person always.

This was Chapter 1 of the traveling biblio chornicles by Lucy Pearson. You can buy the book here from book depository
This book travel series will continue next week when a very special guest is going to recommend us a book set in her native country, Afghanistan.
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