books, REVIEWS

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

I guess it was ‘maktub’ that I won’t like this book at all and struggle to finish it without making faces every other page.

#theguywiththebookreview presents The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The book is about chasing our dreams and giving everything to fulfill our ‘personal legend’ which for Santiago according to a fortune teller, is to travel to the Pyramids wherein lies a treasure waiting to be found by him.

Obviously the journey to find the treasure isn’t expected to be easy and Santiago keeps taking risks and working hard to get closer and closer to his goal. At no part dod I feel any empathy, sympathy or any emotion towards Santiago or his so called journey, I just couldn’t be bothered. Extremely bland protagonist and so were the rest in the book. One of the worst aspects about this book was the repetition. We get it, the whole universe conspires to make our dreams come true. We don’t need being told that half a dozen times.

That’s basically what the Alchemist is about with a lot of life lessons, some subtle but most of them forced towards the reader making them feel extremely unnatural. It’s very much like how The forty rules of love crammed in 40 rules randomly making it sound more like a lecture you don’t want to be part of.

There was one part in the book where it’s implied that Hijab is for Married women but not for single women, so yeah…Maktub indeed.

I have an affiliate link you can use to buy the book…but why bother…? Use it HERE to buy something else.

books

Chapter 3: Egypt (The Traveling Biblio Chronicles)

Noha Badawi from @thebookishword is joining us today to recommend us a book based in Cairo, Egypt. I’ve known Noha through her bookstagram since more than a year and really love her Instagram for all this bookish and photography!

You can find Noha on her Social channels below

Instagram: @thebookishword

Website: www.thebookishword.wordpress.com

Goodreads: thebookishword

COB.jpgCity of Brass is a journey through my town; Cairo

Picking up City of Brass was one of the best decisions to do in 2018. It’s not easy to come across a novel about Egyptians, their mythologies and the history of Arabs. It warmed my history geek-heart, filled my Muslim heart with a starlight of happiness. This book was like I was immediately transported into the tales of Aladdin and the lamp, a journey through the Arabian Nightsand oh boy, it was so damn good.

On the streets of Cairo, during the 18th century, Nahri doesn’t believe in magic; ignoring the powers she obviously have. She’s a con woman with unequaled talents and she’s well aware that what she practices on the streets of Cairo to survive – palm readings, zars, and healings – are tricks, illusions and statement to the slight of her hands. In a zar, Nahri spoke the long lost language of her ancestors – whom she knows nothing of – and accidentally summoned an equally sly, dark and mysterious djinn warrior to her side. Not existent in her childhood memories of tales and stories anymore, Nahri has to accept the magical world. When the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass?

A city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound. In Daevabad, old resentments are simmering behind gilded brass walls with six gates – one for each djinn tribe. Entering this world, Nahri learns the true meaning of power, magic and all about this whole cunning world. But her powers and talents cannot yet shield her from the cruel politics of the court in Daevabad. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences. After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for. 

Adding voice to this #OwnVoices novel; a tale of a powerfully rich history and a world to mesmerize and marvel at, City of Brass is a novel to not be missed on. It’s an experience, a journey through the old cities to embark upon and never want to detour from.

Here’s my detailed review of City of Brass: City of Brass Full Review

This was Chapter 3 of the traveling biblio chornicles by Noha Badawi. You can buy the book here from book depository
This book travel series will continue next week when our next guest takes us on a a much needed journey to Palestine
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Check out Chapter 1: Australia here

Check out Chapter 2: Afghanistan here